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LGBTQ+ - Risk of Sexual Assault, Harassment, Bullying and Hate Crimes

By RTI International - 2017-03-10

Summary

Study reveals lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people at higher risk for being victims of physical and sexual assault, harassment, bullying, and hate crimes.

"Our research indicates that LGBTQ+ people face significant danger in their daily lives - and that their victimization affects their education, safety, and health"

Main Document

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people are at high risk for being victims of physical and sexual assault, harassment, bullying, and hate crimes, according to a new study by RTI International.

In a newly published report, funded by RTI, RTI researchers analyzed 20 years' worth of published studies on violence and the LGBTQ+ community, which included 102 peer-reviewed papers as well as a few unpublished analyses and non-peer-reviewed papers. With The Henne Group, RTI also carried out a series of focus-group discussions with LGBTQ+ communities in San Francisco; New York City; Durham, North Carolina; and rural Wyoming.

"Our research indicates that LGBTQ+ people face significant danger in their daily lives - and that their victimization affects their education, safety, and health," said Tasseli McKay, a social scientist at RTI and the study's lead author.

The researchers found that in a range of studies with LGBTQ+ individuals, victimization experiences are clearly and consistently correlated with behavioral health conditions and suicidality, sexual risk-taking and HIV status, other long-term physical health issues, and decreased school involvement and achievement. Such effects are often sustained many years after a victimization event.

The focus groups touched on a variety of topics including bullying, hate crimes, harassment and violence.

A transgender participant in a focus group held in Durham, North Carolina said, "Once you've been read as being a trans person, you check out, they check out. For us it's safety. For them, it's discomfort. It's a heightened stigmatization."

Other Key Findings From the Report Include

Despite a public perception of greater acceptance of LGBTQ+ individuals in present-day society, disparities in victimization have remained the same or increased since the 1990s.

Schools are a special concern. Many LGBTQ+ youth reported being afraid or feeling unsafe at school, and school-based victimization of LGBTQ+ youth was associated with decreased school attendance, poorer school performance, and steeply increased risk of suicide attempts. Contradicting the common perception of hate-related victimization as being committed by strangers or acquaintances, LGBTQ+ people are often victimized by close family members, particularly their own parents and, for bisexual women, their male partners.

"We need more research to better understand what policies will provide LGBTQ+ youth with safer school and home environments, what resources provide LGBTQ+ people who are victims of violence the best support and how we can ultimately create a larger societal climate that doesn't tolerate persistent, pervasive, lifelong victimization," McKay said.

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