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LGBT Face Barriers to Assistance for Intimate Partner Violence

By The Williams Institute - 2015-11-18

Summary

Intimate partner violence is more prevalent among certain LGBT populations, but current research is limited.

"There are large gaps in the research about LGBT people’s experiences of intimate partner violence and sexual abuse, and transgender people, in particular, are being left out..."

Main Document

Intimate partner violence is more prevalent among certain LGBT populations, but current research is limited, according to a review of existing literature conducted by Taylor N.T. Brown and Jody L. Herman from the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law. More research on intimate partner violence among LGBT people would allow service providers and policymakers to better address challenges in assisting survivors.

The study, titled “Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Abuse among LGBT People,” reviews research on the prevalence of intimate partner violence and intimate partner sexual abuse among LGBT people, barriers to accessing assistance, and the quality of available help. The authors identified gaps in the research, including limited data from nationally representative samples, particularly for transgender people, and a limited amount of research evaluating programs designed to help LGBT survivors.

Key findings from the report include:

Recommendations for future research include:

“There are large gaps in the research about LGBT people’s experiences of intimate partner violence and sexual abuse, and transgender people, in particular, are being left out,” said Brown, co-author of the report and policy analyst at the Williams Institute. “Much more can be done to better understand, address and prevent intimate partner violence and sexual abuse within the LGBT population.”

Full report:

http://williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/Intimate-Partner-Violence-and-Sexual-Abuse-among-LGBT-People.pdf

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