Printer Icon

96,000 Same-sex Couples Married Since U.S. Supreme Court Decision

By The Williams Institute - 2015-11-07

Summary

Same-sex American couples who have tied the knot account for 11 percent of all summer weddings.

"In the first half of 2015, same-sex couples comprised just 6 percent of all marriages. From July to October, same-sex couples comprised 11 percent of all marriages."

Main Document

Since the U.S. Supreme Court legalized marriage equality nationwide in June, the 96,000 same-sex couples who have tied the knot account for 11 percent of all summer weddings, according to an analysis released by Gary J. Gates, Blachford-Cooper Distinguished Scholar and Research Director, and Taylor N.T. Brown, Policy Analyst, at the Williams Institute at UCLA School of Law.

The study, titled “Marriage and Same-sex Couples after Obergefell,” analyzes new data from the Gallup Daily Tracking survey and the American Community Survey to show the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court decisions in Windsor v. United States in June 2013 and Obergefell v. Hodges in June 2015.

“These data make it clear that the majority of same-sex couples in the United States will soon be married,” Gates said. “That means more American children can benefit from the stability and economic security that marriage can provide. It also means that it will be easier for more families to adopt some of the country’s most vulnerable children and provide stable and loving homes.”

Key findings from the report include:

“As Americans attend the weddings of their friends, family, and work colleagues, research shows that support for marriage equality will continue to grow,” Gates said.

Full Report:

williamsinstitute.law.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/Marriage-and-Same-sex-Couples-after-Obergefell-November-2015.pdf

Related Information





96,000 Same-sex Couples Married Since U.S. Supreme Court Decision


Marriage Equality - Proposed Rule Change by Treasury Department


Carly Fiorina Denies Own Words on Marriage Equality



The LGBT pride flag was designed by San Francisco artist Gilbert Baker in 1978. It was originally called the Freedom Flag and was comprised of 8 colored stripes, each denoting a different meaning.

LGBT colors and meaning

Neurological Research Supports Existence of Disorders Due to Addictive Sexual Behavior


Topless Women in NY Celebrate 25 Years of Equal Rights


Women in Technology and Veteran Service Scholarships


Cite This Document