Printer Icon

How to Tell Your Partner May Cheat on You

By McMaster University - 2014-10-11 - Updated: 2016-02-09

Summary

Study examines link between voice pitch and perceived infidelity and offers insight into evolution of human voice and how we choose our mates.

"In terms of sexual strategy, we found that men and women will use voice pitch as a warning sign of future betrayal"

Main Document

Can you predict your mate will cheat by their voice?

When choosing a partner, women believe the lower the man's voice, the more likely he's going to cheat. Conversely, men think a woman with a higher voice is more likely to be unfaithful, researchers have found.

The study, published in the latest edition of the online journal Evolutionary Psychology is the first to examine the link between voice pitch and perceived infidelity and offers insight into the evolution of the human voice and how we choose our mates.

"In terms of sexual strategy, we found that men and women will use voice pitch as a warning sign of future betrayal. So the more attractive the voice, a higher pitch for women and lower pitch for men, the more likely the chances he or she will cheat," says Jillian O'Connor, a graduate student in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour at McMaster University and lead author of the study.

"Infidelity is costly with the emotional impact, financial costs and potential loss of the family unit. But this suggests that through the evolutionary process, we have learned ways to avoid partners who may be unfaithful as a protection mechanism," she says.

Participants in the study were asked to listen to two versions of recorded clips from a male voice and a female voice, which were electronically manipulated to be both higher and lower in pitch. They were then asked which one, from each pair, was more likely to cheat sexually on their romantic partner.

"The reason voice pitch influences perceptions of cheating is likely due to the relationship between pitch, hormones and infidelity," explains David Feinberg, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour and advisor on the study. "Men with higher testosterone levels have lower pitched voices, and women with higher estrogen levels have higher pitched voices. High levels of these hormones are associated with adulterous behaviour and our findings indicate individuals are somewhat aware of the link and may use this in their search for a romantic partner."

Comments and Discussions

Do you agree, disagree, or want to add an opinion on this topic? We welcome relevant discussions and your unique insights.

Related Information on This Topic

Cite This Document

Sex Addiction - There is More to The Story - Sex can be every bit as addictive as alcohol and drugs--and a great deal of research backs up this assertion


Women As Decorative Accessories: Keep Silent or Take a Stance? - First study to show how to raise willingness in women to support protest action against female sexual objectification in the media


Sexual Orientation: What Scientists Know and Do Not Know - LGBT rights hinges on questions about the prevalence, causes, and consequences of non-heterosexual orientations


Gallup Survey Shows Over 10 Million American Adults Identify as LGBTQ - New Gallup survey reveals increase in United States adults identifying as LGBTQ - 10 million, or 4.1% of the population, compared to 8.3M 4 years ago


GLAAD Launches Trump Accountability Project - Trump Accountability Project (TAP) is a resource for news makers reporting on the Trump administration which catalogues anti-LGBTQ statements and actions of Donald Trump and those in or being considered for his administration


F*ck Without Fear Campaign to Reduce HIV Infection Rate by Promoting PrEP - F*ck W/Out Fear is the message of new Los Angeles LGBT Center Campaign to reduce HIV infection rate by promoting PrEP