Porn Policy: Reducing Discrimination and Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Author: Inderscience Publishers
Published: Tuesday 28th October 2014 - Updated: Friday 23rd January 2015
Summary: Information regarding reducing discrimination and sexual harassment through a strict workplace pornography policy.


Employers must have in place a strict policy regarding pornography in the workplace if they are to avoid legal action from sexual harassment and discrimination charges, according to a study by Craig Cameron of the Griffith University.

Writing in the International Journal of Technology Policy and Law, Cameron identified five primary methods of what he refers to as pornography participation that require specific policies to protect both employer and employee in almost any jurisdiction.

According to Cameron, technology has allowed pornography to infiltrate the workplace, which now means that employment policies and rules must be put in place to ensure employees can enjoy their legal right to a safe workplace free of sexual harassment and discrimination.

He has investigated the problem of workplace pornography from the perspective of Australian employment law but points out that the same technological and social issues are present in almost every country.

His findings could point employers in Australia and elsewhere to the creation of a robust policy on the use of pornography in the workplace.

Cameron's study revealed that there are five types of employee participation with pornography that are common in the workplace.

"Despite its perceived social stigma and legal consequences for the employee, pornography remains a prevalent issue in the workplace," Cameron says. "The accessibility, portability, affordability and anonymity of new technologies will continue to facilitate the infiltration of electronic pornography into the workplace."

He points out that an employer that fails to enforce an appropriate policy banning pornography might be liable to prosecution under discrimination and sexual harassment as such a failure would essentially be a breach of the employer's duty of care to the health, safety and well-being of all of those in the workplace. While pornography can have a specific definition, employers could readily extend their policy to include non-pornographic but sexually related, sexually explicit, offensive or objectionable material.

"Electronic porn in the workplace: a policy examination" in Int. J. Technology Policy and Law, 2012, 1, 120-134


Similar Topics


From our Discrimination section - Full List (43 Items)

Send us your coming events and LGBTQ related news stories.


More Than One Million LGBTQ Adults in the US Identify as Nonbinary


Same-Sex Parents are More Likely than Different-Sex Parents to Raise Adopted and Foster Children


Sexuality is Often Fluid


A Significant Number of Transgender Adults in the US have no IDs with the Correct Gender Marker


Latest Issue of the 'Positive Approaches Journal' Focuses on Sexuality and Connectedness


A Hand Holding Me: Love is Love


UK to Host its First Global LGBT Conference


The Power of Conversations - LGBTQ+ Stories




LGBT Awareness & Events
List of important LGBT awareness dates and coming sexual diversity events.


Transgender Reporting Guide - English
Guide for those writing on transgender and LGBT community - Spanish Version.
Sexuality Definitions
List of definitions and glossary of sexual terms, abbreviations and their meanings.

SexualDiversity.org is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com