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Same Sex Adoption

Author: Marcella Martinez
Published: 12th Nov 2016
Peer-Reviewed Publication: N/A
Additional References: IVF, Adoption, Fertility Publications

Summary: Studies have shown that children raised by a homosexual couple are no more likely to become gay or lesbian than children raised by a heterosexual couple.


Main Document

Just imagine a loving couple completely happy and committed to one another. They both have careers, just bought a new home, and are now ready to start a family. They are constantly told they would be great parents one day. That day is today, and they are extremely excited to start the process in adopting a child. They drive up to the adoption service agency, paperwork is being processed, then something stops them. They have been rejected, not because they have a bad criminal record, but rejected due to the simple fact they are a homosexual couple. Many children in the foster care system are lacking permanent, nurturing, loving, and successful homes because a homosexual couple are rejected due to their sexual orientation.

Just imagine a loving couple completely happy and committed to one another. They both have careers, just bought a new home, and are now ready to start a family. They are constantly told they would be great parents one day. That day is today, and they are extremely excited to start the process in adopting a child. They drive up to the adoption service agency, paperwork is being processed, then something stops them. They have been rejected, not because they have a bad criminal record, but rejected due to the simple fact they are a homosexual couple. Many children in the foster care system are lacking permanent, nurturing, loving, and successful homes because a homosexual couple are rejected due to their sexual orientation.

According to Lifelong Adoptions (2016), "more than 16,000 homosexual couples are raising an estimated 22,000 adopted children in the United States." Homosexual parents are four times more likely than heterosexual parents to be raising an adopted child. Some people believe that if a child is raised by same sex parents the child will become gay or lesbian (Find Law, 2016). Studies have shown that children raised by a homosexual couple are no more likely to become gay or lesbian than children raised by a heterosexual couple (Find Law, 2016).

In addition, there are other stereotypes we hear all the time when it comes to situations like this, because people are not accepting of equality. For instance, one stereotype is that children raised by gay parents are more likely to be sexually abused. According to Find Law (2016), in a study of 269 cases of child sex abuse, there were only two offenders who were homosexuals. In conclusion, "the study found that the risk of a child being sexually abused by his or her heterosexual relative is a hundred times greater than by someone who is homosexual" (Find Law, 2016). Stereotypes can either break us or make us stronger. I believe the lesbian, gay, bi, and transgender (LGBT) community has become stronger because it wants to show society that individuals who are LGBT can be nurturing parents as well as heterosexual couples are with their biological children. This amazing LGBT community is stepping up in caring for children who are without a parent. I think about the thousands of children who need loving homes with parents who are willing to play positive roles in their lives.

In the United states, there are approximately 400,000 children in the foster care system waiting to be adopted (About Us Kids, 2016). The ages range from infant to 21 years-old (depending on the state, it can also be 18 or when the child is out of high school). The average age is more than 8 years old, and there are more boys than girls (About Us, Kids, 2016). The average amount of time a child spends in foster care is little over a year.) Every year, about 20,000 children will age out of the foster care system when they have reached a certain age (18 or 21, depending on the state) or are out of high school. Unfortunately, many of these children are at risk of poor education, homelessness, and being unemployed (About Us Kids, 2016). These statistics can decrease if the United States would allow homosexuals to adopt. These children are our future, so it's important they are given the opportunities to be placed in a loving home regardless of their adoptive parents' sexual orientation.

In conclusion, love is love. Children who come from unsafe homes or who have lost parents due to death or abandonment just want someone to love and care for them. According to Adopt American Network (2016), "for these children, every day that passes without a family is like an eternity, especially since they are dealing with very special needs and situations." These may include neglect, abuse that sexual, physical or emotional, mentally or medically delicate children, large groups of siblings, minorities, and older children (Adopt American Network, 2016). When it comes to adoption, it shouldn't be about your sexual orientation. The reason for adoption is to help a child who is in need of love and a better future.

References

Adopt American Network, (2016). Waiting Children Waiting for a family is the longest wait of all. Retrieved by: http://www.adoptamericanetwork.org/waiting-children/

About US Kids, *2016). About the Children. Retrieved by: http://www.adoptuskids.org/meet-the-children/children-in-foster-care/about-the-children

Find Law, (20l6). Gay and Lesbian Adopted Parents: Issues and Concerns. Retrieved by: http://family.findlaw.com/adoption/gay-and-lesbian-adoptive-parents-issues-and-concerns.html

Life Long Adoptions, (2016). LGBT Adoption Statistics. Retrieved by: http://www.lifelongadoptions.com/lgbt-adoption/lgbt-adoption-statistics

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• (APA): Marcella Martinez. (2016, November 12). Same Sex Adoption. SexualDiversity.org. Retrieved May 24, 2024 from www.sexualdiversity.org/news/same/ivf/644.php


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