High School Crushes - The Painful Years


Source: Sexual Diversity
Published: 2014-11-25
Summary: High school years are the best part of life as this is a time of youth, girlfriends, boyfriends, rebelliousness, and hormones.


Many people consider their high school years to be the best part of their life - and they have good reasons to feel this way. High school is a time of youth, girlfriends, boyfriends, rebelliousness, and hormones.

It's the first time when we actually get a taste of freedom.

Because of these reasons, high school relationships are often intense, full of possibilities, and may even lead up to a lifelong commitment.

When people meet in high school, this means that they meet during a time when they're still trying to figure out their identity. Our personalities during this delicate time are very dynamic - our interests, friends, and hobbies change constantly. Because of this, keeping a high school relationship takes a lot of energy and effort. The good thing about this is that we can use the high school love lessons later on in life.

Here are some of the lessons we learn from our high school relationships:

Love can be like a fairytale... until reality sets in.

Remember your first fight with your high school love?

It probably seemed like the end of the world, but most high school girlfriends and boyfriends get over their first fight and reconcile. They also form a stronger bond after this. After your first fight with your first love, you'll learn that true love weathers through everything.

Look beyond appearances.

If you or one of your friends ever had a crush on the most unlikely people, you know exactly what I mean.

Everyone seems to fall for the jocks and the cheerleaders, but once in a while, someone becomes attracted to the bookworms or the chess team captains.

Just because a person doesn't have a pool or a nice car, it doesn't mean that they don't know how to sweep you off of your feet.

Let the other person know how you feel.

Most shy people regret not telling their high school crush about they way they felt - and they're right to feel this way. Regret is a hard thing to live with, and while we don't know this in high school, we'll know it a few years after graduation. The atmosphere that high school has is pretty much "live for the moment", and this is a philosophy that you should carry with you for the rest of your life. After all, you have nothing to lose. If the other person isn't open to feeling the same way about you, consider it their loss.

You win some, and you lose some.

Teenagers aren't exactly easy to gauge - it's hard to tell if someone likes you back or not.

Whether you're asking someone out on a date or to the prom, you're bound to get rejected at least once. While rejections may hurt, it's best to keep in mind that there are more fish in the sea, and that someone out there will be happy to say "yes" to you. The rejections you get in high school tend to toughen you up, and they teach you to take pleasure in hope when things don't go your way.

This information is from our Adolescent Sexuality Information section - Full List Here.

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