Couples Who Live Together - Legal Disputes Increasing

Author: American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers
Published: Thursday 11th February 2016
Summary: Cohabitating couples are splitting up with the help of lawyers in a growing number of relationships.


According to 45% of members in a recent survey of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML), legal disputes between unmarried couples who had previously lived together are on the rise during the past three years.

A significant 70% of the attorneys also noted a decrease in cohabitation agreements being drawn up between same-sex partners since same-sex marriage has been legalized.

"Even without an engagement ring or marriage license, a live-in relationship can often produce a number of legal complexities and tangled disputes that could require the involvement of legal counsel," said Joslin Davis, president of the AAML.

"While cohabitation agreements might represent an effective option for a variety of partners with finances and assets to protect, we are also finding a substantial decrease in these contracts for same-sex clients, coinciding with the marriage equality movement in recent times."

Overall, 45% of AAML members have cited an increase in the number of legal disputes between unmarried couples who had previously lived together during the past three years, while 53% stated no change, and 2% saw a decrease.

In all, 26% cited an increase in cohabitation agreement requests from unmarried couples, 68% said no change and 6% noted a decrease.

Founded in 1962, the mission of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML) is to provide leadership that promotes the highest degree of professionalism and excellence in the practice of family law.

Comprised of the top 1,600 matrimonial attorneys throughout the nation, members are recognized experts in the specialized areas of matrimonial law, including divorce, prenuptial agreements, legal separation, annulment, custody, property valuation and division, support, and the rights of unmarried couples.

The AAML Fellows across the United States are generally recognized by judges and attorneys as preeminent family law practitioners with a high level of knowledge, skill, and integrity and enjoy a reputation for professionalism, competence, and integrity.


Similar Topics


From our Divorce/Separation section - Full List (7 Items)

Send us your coming events and LGBTQ related news stories.


A Summary of Data on LGBT Suicide for Suicide Prevention Month


LGBT People Could Gain Additional Protections from Discrimination After Bostock


HUD Aims to Reverse Protections for Homeless Transgender People Accessing Shelters


Bisexual Women and Girls Reproductive Health Needs Greater Attention


Only 3% of Sexually Active Transgender People Use PrEP


Experiences of Food Insecurity Among Californian LGBTQ


U.S. DOJ Files Statement of Interest Defending Constitutionality of Idaho's Fairness in Women's Sports Act


US Supreme Court Decision Protects 8.1M LGBT Workers From Employment Discrimination



Tsara Shelton
"Storytellers are powerful and we are all storytellers," suggests Tsara Shelton, author of the book Spinning in Circles and Learning from Myself: A Collection of Stories that Slowly Grow Up..


LGBT Awareness & Events
List of important LGBT awareness dates and coming sexual diversity events.


Transgender Reporting Guide - English
Guide for those writing on transgender and LGBT community - Spanish Version.
Sexuality Definitions
List of definitions and glossary of sexual terms, abbreviations and their meanings.