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Couples Who Live Together - Legal Disputes Increasing

Author: American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers
Published: 11th Feb 2016
Peer-Reviewed Publication: N/A
Additional References: LGBT Divorce and Separation Publications

Summary: Cohabitating couples are splitting up with the help of lawyers in a growing number of relationships.


Main Document

According to 45% of members in a recent survey of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML), legal disputes between unmarried couples who had previously lived together are on the rise during the past three years.

A significant 70% of the attorneys also noted a decrease in cohabitation agreements being drawn up between same-sex partners since same-sex marriage has been legalized.

"Even without an engagement ring or marriage license, a live-in relationship can often produce a number of legal complexities and tangled disputes that could require the involvement of legal counsel," said Joslin Davis, president of the AAML.

"While cohabitation agreements might represent an effective option for a variety of partners with finances and assets to protect, we are also finding a substantial decrease in these contracts for same-sex clients, coinciding with the marriage equality movement in recent times."

Overall, 45% of AAML members have cited an increase in the number of legal disputes between unmarried couples who had previously lived together during the past three years, while 53% stated no change, and 2% saw a decrease.

In all, 26% cited an increase in cohabitation agreement requests from unmarried couples, 68% said no change and 6% noted a decrease.

Founded in 1962, the mission of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers (AAML) is to provide leadership that promotes the highest degree of professionalism and excellence in the practice of family law.

Comprised of the top 1,600 matrimonial attorneys throughout the nation, members are recognized experts in the specialized areas of matrimonial law, including divorce, prenuptial agreements, legal separation, annulment, custody, property valuation and division, support, and the rights of unmarried couples.

The AAML Fellows across the United States are generally recognized by judges and attorneys as preeminent family law practitioners with a high level of knowledge, skill, and integrity and enjoy a reputation for professionalism, competence, and integrity.

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• (APA): American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers. (2016, February 11). Couples Who Live Together - Legal Disputes Increasing. SexualDiversity.org. Retrieved May 27, 2024 from www.sexualdiversity.org/sexuality/love/divorce/631.php


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