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Coming Out on Your Own Terms: Tips for LGBT Individuals

Author: Larisa Wainer
Published: 7th Nov 2014 - Updated: 25th Oct 2022
Peer-Reviewed Publication: Yes
Additional References: LGBTQ+ Coming Out Publications

Summary: Dr. Larisa Wainer provides informative tips for LGBT individuals thinking of coming out of the closet.


Main Document

According to clinical psychologist Dr. Larisa Wainer, as more and more people come to realize that people close to them - their sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, friends, neighbors and co-workers - are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, they become more sensitive to issues of discrimination and equal rights.

Public attitudes toward homosexuality have changed decidedly in the last twenty years. The rapidity of the shift toward greater tolerance of homosexual behavior across all religious and political groups - with younger people leading the way - is evidenced most dramatically in the growing acceptance of same-sex marriage. While there are likely many reasons for the changes in societal attitudes, most experts agree that chief among them is the fact that a substantial majority of Americans now say they have a close friend or family member who is gay or lesbian.

"Those personal connections are the most powerful force underlying a new perception of normalcy or at least acceptance," says clinical psychologist Dr. Larisa Wainer of Morris Psychological Group.

"As more and more people come to realize that people close to them - their sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, friends, neighbors and co-workers - are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender, they become more sensitive to issues of discrimination and equal rights. That shift in turn is fueled by the growing numbers of LGBT people who have made the deeply personal decision to 'come out' - to be honest about who they are and to live openly. That said, coming out isn't easy for anyone and is particularly difficult for young people who may themselves still be struggling to accept their identity."

Coming out is not a single act or a single conversation. It is a process of understanding, accepting and sharing one's identity that may last a lifetime. There is no right way, right time or road map for beginning the process and it is likely to give rise to a wide range of emotions from fear to confusion to relief. "Most people who are hesitant eventually come out because hiding this key aspect of who they are becomes too heavy a burden," says Dr. Wainer, "and they find that however daunting the prospect, the benefits ultimately outweigh the risks." Coming out benefits both the individual, who is free to live an open and authentic life, and others, especially young people, who may gain courage and inspiration from a role model.

Dr. Wainer provides some tips for those who are wrestling with this important decision.

"Being honest with friends and family and living openly will ultimately strengthen relationships with those who are most important to you," says Dr. Wainer. "But it may take time and it may not always go smoothly. No one need make the journey alone. In addition to friends and family, there are support groups and organizations that can provide advice and counsel. Coming out is different for every individual and may indeed go on indefinitely over the course of your life as you meet new people and cross new thresholds. Taking the first step is an important milestone in leading you to a full and fulfilling life."

Larisa Wainer, PsyD., is a licensed psychologist providing psychotherapy to individuals, couples, and groups. She has specific training and experience in issues related to relationships, sexual functioning, anxiety, depression, anger, life transitions and social difficulties.

Morris Psychological Group, P.A. offers a wide range of therapy and evaluation services to adults, children and adolescents - www.morrispsych.com

References and Source(s):

Coming Out on Your Own Terms: Tips for LGBT Individuals | Larisa Wainer. SexualDiversity.org makes no warranties or representations in connection therewith. Content may have been edited for style, clarity or length.

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• (APA): Larisa Wainer. (2014, November 7). Coming Out on Your Own Terms: Tips for LGBT Individuals. SexualDiversity.org. Retrieved April 12, 2024 from www.sexualdiversity.org/sexuality/out/158.php


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